Catalogue > Reviews

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[CD] A Carey Blyton Shoal of Fishes (2016)

The Shoal of Fishes design is terrific – a lovely presentation and certainly “stands out from the crowd”. Many thanks indeed.

Mary Blyton, composer’s window (private correspondence), October 2016

Before I had even played any of the music, I realised at once that this was a ‘quality item’. The presentation box, the booklet and the explanatory notes all combine to make it a very attractive publication for potential buyers.

Frank Bayford, Private correspondence, October 2016

Love your design!

Michael Ponder, Sound Engineer/Producer (private correspondence), October 2016

The composer of hit children’s song Banana [sic] in Pyjamas (and nephew of Enid), Carey Blyton proves himself an artful composer in this charming, well performed collection of fishy wind quintets [sic]. ★★★

Rebecca Franks, BBC Music Magazine, January 2017 (Vol. 25, no 4), December 2016

…the booklet is delightfully littered with coloured drawings of various fish […] and has been beautifully designed…

Gary Higginson, MusicWeb International, December 2016

The performances, it seems to me, could not be bettered.

Gary Higginson, MusicWeb International, December 2016

…this disc is the exquisitely colourful fruit of a collaboration between the Carey Blyton Trust and Peter Thompson’s Fand Music Press.

Rob Barnett, MusicWeb International, December 2016

The music speaks of a salubrious and dignified creative imagination. Carey Blyton knew music’s art and craftsman’s measure and wrote nothing ugly or dull or at odds with art or craft.

Rob Barnett, MusicWeb International, December 2016

…a disc that moves from approaches to the sublime to the broadest humour.

Rob Barnett, MusicWeb International, December 2016


A Catch for Wind Instruments, opus 49 (1965/1966)

Needless to say, a quintet with a bit of imagination would have a marvellous time in programming this work.

Frank Stalzer, Woodwind World, Brass & Percussion, Spring 1978

The music is all imaginative and contented innocence without a dissonant edge to bruise the ears. Even the predatory Pike is portrayed with only a fragile shudder to disturb the effect.

Rob Barnett, MusicWeb International, December 2016


A Child was Born, opus 56a (Summer 1966)

…neat canonic writing…

Arthur Milner, The Musical Times, October 1967

Its simplicity is touching.

William Varcoe, The Lincolnshire Echo, 25th October 1968

(The Danish and Swedish carols) both have a haunting musical arrangement which will make them an unusual acquisition to the Christmas repertoire.

Max Laidlaw, The Leader Post (Regina, Canada), 23th August 1969


A Little Trio for Wind Instruments, opus 18b (February/March 1977)

This is a light, charming work that will present very few performance problems to the college or university major.

Frank Stalzer, Woodwind World, Brass & Percussion, Spring 1978


A Lullaby (O my Deir Hert), opus 24c

Easier, and therefore suitable for less experienced choirs, is Carey Blyton’s charming A Lullaby, which is a setting of the lovely words “O my deir hert.”

Making Music, Autumn 1962

To choirs on the look-out for new songs and cantatas for the Christmas season, I recommend the following … Carey Blyton’s A Lullaby

Musical Opinion, September 1962

Some outstanding works for the Christmas season include A Lullaby by Carey Blyton…

Pianomaker, September 1962

Like much of Mr Blyton’s work, particularly his songs, A Lullaby has much charm, a pleasant melodic line and great expressive qualities … Mr Blyton is fast achieving a reputation as a composer of talent.

The Croydon Advertiser, 10th January 1963

…and among other carols, A Lullaby by Carey Blyton, which proved effective music.

Kentish Times, 17th January 1964


A Newfoundland Posy, opus 72 (May 1975)

…is a work that does deserve to be performed.

Frank Stalzer, Woodwind World, Brass & Percussion, Holiday Issue, 1977


A Woman’s World, opus 46 (November 1964)

Brief, witty and subtle, these three well-contrasted settings successfully mirror the qualities of the verses … A light-hearted and charming publication, well calculated to appeal to sophisticated senior girls.

Neville Atkinson, Music in Education, May/June, 1971


After Hokusai, opus 89 (May 1983)

After Hokusai can be recommended in its own right musically, and for its provision of new and interesting performance material for the intermediate level flautist.

International Journal of Music Education, May 1985

Both intermediate and the most advanced players will find this work a breath of fresh air. Reviewer’s Choice: Music of exceptional quality

Flute Talk, January 1986


Bananas in Pyjamas (September 1972)

Totally nonsensical and full of verbal wit.

Elaine Moss, Children’s Books of the Year, 1972

The expressions on the faces of the children as they launched into Mr Blyton’s work showed clearly why he is gaining such popularity as a composer for young people. [Review of Schools Music Festival in Swanley, Kent, which included performances of Bananas in Pyjamas, Three Food Songs, Three Insect Songs and Three Bird Songs]

T.G.G., Kentish Times, 23th March 1975


Before the Party (May 1969)

It is not often that a critic is made to sit bolt upright in his chair by the music score of a television play or film. Such an experience came to me in 1969 when I saw Before the Party … The composer of this compelling music was Carey Blyton…

Hilton Gough, BFFS Film magazine, no 25, April 1975


Capital City (February 1973)

Here the music, scored for a larger group of instruments than is usual with this composer (11 compared with the usual 3–6), is mildly jazzy, and – in view of the film’s subject matter, the City of London – there are several quotations of well-known London tunes.

Hilton Gough, BFFS Film magazine, no 25, April 1975


Composer Interviews Nº1: Carey Blyton (30th December 1999)

…a genuine snip

BMS News


[CD] Carey Blyton: Film & Television Music (1/4) (2002)

These are fascinating examples of the instrumentator’s craft, and of Blyton’s music; he found many of the ideas too good to waste, and they were incorporated into concert works. Some surprises from a ‘traditional’ composer too—12-note pieces make an appearance.

Derek Foster, Modus Music News, no 16, December 2003


[CD] Carey Blyton: Film & Television Music (2/4) (2003)

These are fascinating examples of the instrumentator’s craft, and of Blyton’s music; he found many of the ideas too good to waste, and they were incorporated into concert works. Some surprises from a ‘traditional’ composer too—12-note pieces make an appearance.

Derek Foster, Modus Music News, no 16, December 2003


[CD] Carey Blyton: Lyrics from the Chinese (2002)

Anyone with an ear for Vaughan Williams, Delius or Britten can’t fail to respond…

The Independent

The last CD I listened to was Carey Blyton’s Lyrics from the Chinese, sung by Ian Partridge with Jennifer Partridge playing the piano. They are very dear friends and we love all their work.

Prunella Scales, actress, Evening Standard’s Metro Life magazine, 60 Second Interview, 15th November 2002

This marvellous disc more than realises my wildest expectations … Lyrics from the East deserves an especial mention. These were written in 2000 for Ian and Jennifer Partridge, who perform them here. The Partridges interpret them beautifully, as they do the other pieces. This CD deserves to be heard and played, for it contains the very best music of a fine composer.

Frank Bayford, Modus Music News, no 12, December 2002

…this album has a craftmanship, freshness and variety that is surprising.

Amazon review, 9th June 2012

Carey Blyton […] is master of his musical idiom. There is often a dark intensity that is well expressed. There is nothing bland here. Vaughan Williams, Holst and Britten in particular come to mind.

Amazon review, 9th June 2012

The performances are outstandingly good and deeply sympathetic throughout and [show] very deep affinity with the music.

Amazon review, 9th June 2012


[CD] Carey Blyton: Sherlock Holmes meets Doctor Who (1999)

…the music is, as always with Blyton, an attractive mixture of brevity and immediacy of appeal…

Musical Opinion


[CD] Carey Blyton: The Early Songs (2001)

…this superb new album … very strongly recommended…

Musical Opinion


[CD] Carey Blyton: The folksong arrangements (1997)

An Eskimo Lullaby may seem to us more interesting than Camptown Races

Musical Opinion, September 1954

The winners on the disc, I think, are Suo-gân, a splendid Welsh melody … Tryphena Partridge plays the harp accompaniments for the Welsh songs most acceptably…

Records and Recording, April 1964

…old, open-air bonhomie of the Canadian songs…

Records and Recording, April 1964

Of the Welsh songs, I am particularly glad to have the lovely lullaby, Suo-gân … very well accompanied on the harp in the Welsh songs.

The Gramophone, May 1964

…of the three carols I think that The Huron Carol is outstanding, but all three are notable for the effective economy of the accompaniments.

The Gramophone, September 1965

…you should assuredly purchase Onslo’s new LP containing further Canadian folk songs by the Beckenham composer, Carey Blyton. (The first disc … was highly praised by me two years ago.)

The Croydon Advertiser, 31st March 1966

…I hope we shall hear much more of his compositions in “The Gramophone World”.

The Croydon Advertiser, 10th June 1966


[CD] Carey Blyton: The Guitar Music (1995)

…a constant delight throughout.

Musical Opinion


[CD] Carey Blyton: The Piano Music (1996)

…cries out for revaluation as a genuine 20th Century musical maverick…

EPTA Journal


Cinque Port (Music for an Opera), opus 28a (1957/1958)

…comprising tuneful melodies for an opera.

Manchester Evening Chronicle, 1st February 1962

…was crisp, and, as programme music, very enjoyable.

Manchester Evening News, 1st February 1962

…has a wistful charm which greater familiarity would no doubt emphasise.

The Daily Telegraph, 1st February 1962

…has a good deal more than its undoubted ingenuity and competence to put on the credit side.

The Guardian, 1st February 1962

…is direct and unpretentious music, simply and capably laid out. It was a pleasure to listen to…

The Times, 1st February 1962

…a highly coloured piece of impressionism … The work contains some beautiful and effective music and is built up skilfully into a piece of great charm…

The Croydon Advertiser, 13th February 1962

…contains self-assured music … If there is a fault, it lies in the brevity of some sections … Among the good things … the sensitive scoring of the Interlude must be mentioned, and one realises Blyton can handle an orchestra and that his effects “come off” … a composer who is a sensitive craftsman … Mr Blyton took an enthusiastic call…

Kentish Times, 14th February 1962


Collected Short Stories and Summer in the Country (Autobiography) (2002)

Buy this book and read it; enjoy the gentle humour and wonder about a man who so loves to write he does it in words, songs and music; and all very well indeed.

Musical Opinion

[Readers] may well be surprised, one hopes pleasantly, by this lovely and entertaining collection of [Carey Blyton’s] short stories, written over a period of thirty years.

Gary Higginson, MusicWeb International, July 2002

There were times when I thought seriously to myself that Carey Blyton may well be a better writer than composer, but then I thought again…

Gary Higginson, MusicWeb International, July 2002

Some are whimsical, some ironic, a few sentimental and one or two autobiographical – parallels to his compositions, perhaps. All are readable and pleasantly written…

Philip Scowcroft, MusicWeb International, July 2002

…fascinating as an insight into Carey [Blyton]’s formative experiences…

Cliff Watkins, Salisbury Journal, 22nd July 2002

…a charming autobiographical essay…

Martin Anderson, The Independent, 25th July 2002


Doctor Who: Death to the Daleks (January 1974)

…another remarkable score…

Hilton Gough, BFFS Film magazine, no 25, April 1975

All in all, a highly original score which stood out in sharp contrast to the usual radiophonic blancmange which accompanies the majority of Doctor Who serials.

Hilton Gough, BFFS Film magazine, no 25, April 1975

A brilliant touch … was that the music associated with the Daleks sounded like Dalek music—it had the same quality and ‘wobble’ as Dalek speech. This was one of the few radiophonic touches in the whole score: in the hands of a master, a little does indeed go a very long way.

Hilton Gough, BFFS Film magazine, no 25, April 1975

I for one appreciated what I can only describe as the ‘Exxilon Chant’—a most hypnotic kind of primitive chant based on what seemed to be some sort of dog Latin text: I understand that this imposing edifice of choral sound was built up entirely from a solo voice … another example of a little going a long way, with a vengeance!

Hilton Gough, BFFS Film magazine, no 25, April 1975

…he had a brilliant way of making weird noises with conventional instruments. …you had them chanting and doing that fantastic tune … That was the first thing I ever learnt to play on an instrument, you know that? … Most people learn London’s Burning, but I learnt that!

Nick Briggs, Executive Producer, Big Finish, Beneath the City of the Exxilons (documentary), BBCDVD 3483, 2012


Dirge for St Patrick’s Night, opus 110 (26th February 2000)

…extraordinarily moving

Michael Pilkington, Singing

Dirge for St Patrick’s Night […] makes searing impact.

Amazon review, 9th June 2012


Doctor Who: Doctor Who and the Silurians (December 1969)

…a rather long-drawn-out affair (seven episodes), was only redeemed by what one writer described as; “one of the most hair-raising science fiction scores heard this side of Alpha Centauri.” Interestingly, this was achieved, I later discovered, by means of such instruments as krumhorns and medieval recorders, plus prepared piano effects (plucked notes and banshee-like sounds from inside a grand piano), and not via the Radiophonic Workshop at all. Clearly, here was a composer who needed investigating.

Hilton Gough, BFFS Film magazine, no 25, April 1975

As a score, as a conception, it was very intelligent. He was thinking about these creatures that had been lying dormant in the earth and had come back to life after many, many millions of years, and so he decided to structure his score using largely mediæval instruments: ancient instruments.

Mark Ayres, Radiophonic Workshop composer, Musical Scales: An Era of Experimentation, BBCDVD 2438(A), 2008


Dracula! or The Vampire Vanquished, opus 87a (January 1983)

But for sheer fun, his two Victorian Melodramas for Schools are convulsing, especially when performed with the prescribed ‘Music Hall Orchestra’ … A recording by the Redbridge School on Meridian is well recommended.

Wally Horwood, The British Bandsman, March 1985


Five Diversions, opus 1a (1949/1950)

The music is peaceable, subtly textured and blessed. The sequence ends with a Little Waltz which is dedicated to Blyton’s piano teacher of his teenage years.

Rob Barnett, MusicWeb International, December 2016


Five Diversions, opus 1b (April 1990)

The Five Diversions are an arrangement for Wind Quintet of earlier works. The music is peaceable, subtly textured and blessed. The sequence ends with a Little Waltz which is dedicated to Blyton’s piano teacher of his teenage years. It would go well in concert with Ibert’s Trois Pièces Brèves.

Rob Barnett, MusicWeb International, December 2016


Flying Birds (December 1972)

A very beautiful film, with a haunting score by Blyton played by the London Saxophone Quartet (in which the music comprises a theme – ‘bird flight’ – and nine variations)…

Hilton Gough, BFFS Film magazine, no 25, April 1975


Flying Birds, opus 66 (December 1972)

…a haunting score by Blyton … in which the music comprises a theme – ‘bird flight’ – and nine variations…

Hilton Gough, BFFS Film magazine, no 25, April 1975


Fugue in G minor by Girolamo Frescobaldi, opus 62a (August 1971)

Frescobaldi’s telling counterpoint, Blyton’s meticulous attention to dynamic and phrasing marks and the clearly printed score and parts make this an effective publication for performance and educational use.

Woodwind World, Brass & Percussion, July 1979


Fugue in G minor by Girolamo Frescobaldi, opus 62b

Frescobaldi’s telling counterpoint, Blyton’s meticulous attention to dynamic and phrasing marks and the clearly printed score and parts make this an effective publication for performance and educational use.

Woodwind World, Brass & Percussion, July 1979


Fun with Figures, opus 41 (1963)

…very persuasive. At least one, The Ruined Abbey, although brief, became a telling evocation of atmosphere.

Kentish Times, August 1966


In Memoriam Django Reinhardt, opus 64a (Spring 1972)

…a tender, almost melting little song with two variations … a very refined piece in a deliberately innocent style.

La Sesia (Vercelli, Italy), 1st December 1972

…the better-sweet melody, in ballad form … that musical gusto which appears to be uncontrived, but is actually consciously constructed and finely chiselled into shape.

Angelo Gilardino, Strumenti e Musica, May 1973

…makes no claim to imitate the Old Man himself but only to evoke the era in which he lived, and this it does very successfully.

Mary Criswick, The Musical Times, January 1974

…the catchy jazz idiom of Carey Blyton’s “In Memoriam Django Reinhardt”…

D.O., The Oxford Mail, 9th March 1974

…the enchanting simplicity of its melodic invention.

I.H-M., The Croydon Advertiser, 18th March 1976

…has wit and charm, as well as firm craftsmanship.

David Shellan, Kentish Times, 28th September 1978


In Memoriam Django Reinhardt, opus 64b (Spring 1972)

…a tender, almost melting little song with two variations … a very refined piece in a deliberately innocent style.

La Sesia (Vercelli, Italy), 1st December 1972

…the better-sweet melody, in ballad form … that musical gusto which appears to be uncontrived, but is actually consciously constructed and finely chiselled into shape.

Angelo Gilardino, Strumenti e Musica, May 1973

…makes no claim to imitate the Old Man himself but only to evoke the era in which he lived, and this it does very successfully.

Mary Criswick, The Musical Times, January 1974

…the catchy jazz idiom of Carey Blyton’s “In Memoriam Django Reinhardt”…

D.O., The Oxford Mail, 9th March 1974

…the enchanting simplicity of its melodic invention.

I.H-M., The Croydon Advertiser, 18th March 1976

…has wit and charm, as well as firm craftsmanship.

David Shellan, Kentish Times, 28th September 1978


In Memoriam Scott Fitzgerald, opus 60a (1971)

…Blyton conjures up the American ‘lost generation’ of the 1920s, its cosmopolitanism and romantic spirit, both simple and contrived, supported by harmonies evoking atmosphere.

(Unidentified Italian review)

…his nostalgic saxophone quartet movement which has been a favourite in the quartet classs at the annual Woodwind Workshops.

Maxwell Holgate, Crescendo, March 1978


In Memoriam Scott Fitzgerald, opus 60b (1972)

…Blyton conjures up the American ‘lost generation’ of the 1920s, its cosmopolitanism and romantic spirit, both simple and contrived, supported by harmonies evoking atmosphere.

(Unidentified Italian review)


In Memoriam Scott Fitzgerald, opus 60c (April 1977)

…Blyton conjures up the American ‘lost generation’ of the 1920s, its cosmopolitanism and romantic spirit, both simple and contrived, supported by harmonies evoking atmosphere.

(Unidentified Italian review)


The Wednesday Play: It Wasn’t Me (February 1969)

…a black comedy by James Hanley about the age-old problem of old age, had a most disquieting and glacial score played by a few wind instruments … Clearly, here was a composer who needed investigating.

Hilton Gough, BFFS Film magazine, no 25, April 1975


Kites are Flying (November 1970)

…a taut, economical score in which the lyricism of the kite’s flight and the panoramic beauty of the Welsh hills are depicted in simple, direct, musical terms.

Hilton Gough, BFFS Film magazine, no 25, April 1975


Lachrymae—In Memoriam John Dowland, opus 23a (April 1956; 1957/1958; April/May 1960)

…attractive talent; there are nice ideas and tidy handling.

The Financial Times, 15th January 1963

…Blyton shows a great deal of skill in using these forces to keen dramatic effect. Certainly a ‘must’ for an English music programme.

Richard Terry, The Croydon Advertiser, 22nd June 1967

Carey Blyton uses fine musical expression to convey the emotional content of the poetry.

Jennifer Anderson, Dartford Reporter, 23th June 1967

…throughout, the writing for the voice is masterly. The style is terse and civilised … this highly professional score.

Norman Harvey, Kentish Times, 23th June 1967

…the piece was well-written. Within the prevailing bitterness of mood determined by the texts there were sufficient contrasts of tempo and texture to keep it alive, with effective dance-rhythms in the third song.

The Times Educational Supplement, 23th June 1967

The “Chines Lyrics”, as the songs of “Lachrymae”, possess enormous popular appeal because they have good, strong, virile melodies … Mr Blyton scored an immediate success at Nottingham … many in the audience demanded an immediate encore of the “Chinese Lyrics”.

Richard Terry, The Croydon Advertiser, 27th July 1967

Especially in the setting of words to music, Blyton’s economy of style and use of accompaniment always heightens the drama or lyricism of the words themselves…

David Mottley, The Croydon Advertiser, 9th April 1970

…the craftsmanship and sensitivity of this composer made this work agreeable to the ear…

Norman Harvey, Kentish Times, 10th April 1970

I have no doubt that these two song-cycles [Lyrics from the Chinese and Lachrymae—In Memoriam John Dowland] for voice and strings are Carey’s masterpieces. They have a magic about them that glows from every bar and the word settings truly illuminate the poems.

Frank Bayford, Modus Music News, no 12, December 2002


Lachrymae—In Memoriam John Dowland, opus 23b (1967)

…attractive talent; there are nice ideas and tidy handling.

The Financial Times, 15th January 1963

…Blyton shows a great deal of skill in using these forces to keen dramatic effect. Certainly a ‘must’ for an English music programme.

Richard Terry, The Croydon Advertiser, 22nd June 1967

Carey Blyton uses fine musical expression to convey the emotional content of the poetry.

Jennifer Anderson, Dartford Reporter, 23th June 1967

…throughout, the writing for the voice is masterly. The style is terse and civilised … this highly professional score.

Norman Harvey, Kentish Times, 23th June 1967

…the piece was well-written. Within the prevailing bitterness of mood determined by the texts there were sufficient contrasts of tempo and texture to keep it alive, with effective dance-rhythms in the third song.

The Times Educational Supplement, 23th June 1967

The “Chines Lyrics”, as the songs of “Lachrymae”, possess enormous popular appeal because they have good, strong, virile melodies … Mr Blyton scored an immediate success at Nottingham … many in the audience demanded an immediate encore of the “Chinese Lyrics”.

Richard Terry, The Croydon Advertiser, 27th July 1967

Especially in the setting of words to music, Blyton’s economy of style and use of accompaniment always heightens the drama or lyricism of the words themselves…

David Mottley, The Croydon Advertiser, 9th April 1970

…the craftsmanship and sensitivity of this composer made this work agreeable to the ear…

Norman Harvey, Kentish Times, 10th April 1970

I have no doubt that these two song-cycles [Lyrics from the Chinese and Lachrymae—In Memoriam John Dowland] for voice and strings are Carey’s masterpieces. They have a magic about them that glows from every bar and the word settings truly illuminate the poems.

Frank Bayford, Modus Music News, no 12, December 2002


Low Water (April 1966)

…a film whose inherent bleakness and sombreness is pitilessly underlined by Carey Blyton’s equally bleak and sombre score.

Hilton Gough, BFFS Film magazine, no 25, April 1975


Lyrics from the Chinese, opus 16b (Winter 1957/1958)

…ranking the composer as a song writer with the same kind of evocative power and feeling as Benjamin Britten.

John Coggan, Nottingham Guardian Journal, 17th July 1967

Blyton seems to be that rare thing among modern composers, a craftsman who has a great sense of beauty coupled with an inspirational gift for a virile tune.

Richard Terry, Kentish Times, 21st July 1967

The “Chines Lyrics”, as the songs of “Lachrymae”, possess enormous popular appeal because they have good, strong, virile melodies … Mr Blyton scored an immediate success at Nottingham … many in the audience demanded an immediate encore of the “Chinese Lyrics”.

Richard Terry, The Croydon Advertiser, 27th July 1967

…often highly eloquent and extremely beautiful. Blyton’s music, particularly his vocal writings, where perhaps he is at his most assured and captivating, is basically very easily approachable.

David Mottley, The Croydon Advertiser, 9th April 1970

The whole cycle is deeply felt and attractive, well laid out for voice and strings…

Norman Harvey, Kentish Times, 10th April 1970

I have no doubt that these two song-cycles [Lyrics from the Chinese and Lachrymae—In Memoriam John Dowland] for voice and strings are Carey’s masterpieces. They have a magic about them that glows from every bar and the word settings truly illuminate the poems.

Frank Bayford, Modus Music News, no 12, December 2002


Lyrics from the East, opus 109 (January/February 2000)

…surprisingly effective

Michael Pilkington, Singing

Lyrics from the East shows a striking variety of mood and tone colour … Blyton was Britten’s editor in the 1960s and it is easy to imagin[e] Peter Pears singing many of the songs presented here.

Amazon review, 9th June 2012


Mixed Bag, opus 34 (October 1962/May 1963)

…effective, with hints of magic here and there.

Kentish Times, 16th October 1964

…would probably work well as action songs with Primary school children…

The Musical Times, August 1966


Mock Joplin, opus 69a (August 1974)

The work deserves your attention.

The Instrumentalist, January 1981


Moresques, opus 14 (Summer 1952, revised Summer 1979)

…showed how singable Blyton’s music is … probably his best work so far.

Beckenham Journal, 27th February 1953


On Holiday, opus 54 (Spring 1968)

…provided such excellent opportunities for solo contributions from the orchestra.

Richard Terry, The Croydon Advertiser, 27th June 1968

The scoring was sensitive and effective…

Norman Harvey, Kentish Times, 28th June 1968


Pantomime, opus 45a (August 1964)

Three sparkling pieces … sure to captivate young players.

Musical Opinion, June 1967


Pantomime, opus 45b (April 1972)

…was particularly interesting…

Birmingham Mail, 17th February 1973

A feature which stands out in Blyton’s writing for the saxophone quartet is the economy of scoring. All the works … are very easy to play from a technical point of view, but they are extremely difficult to play well, owing to the transparency of the textures, in which every note is important. [from The Saxophone Quartet Music of Carey Blyton by the leader of the London Saxophone Quartet]

Paul Harvey, World Saxophone Congress Newsletter, Vol. IV no 3, 1974


Pantomime, opus 45c

Three sparkling pieces … sure to captivate young players.

Musical Opinion, June 1967


Pantomime, opus 45d

Three sparkling pieces … sure to captivate young players.

Musical Opinion, June 1967


Pastiches, opus 4a (1949/1950)

…and very skilful parodies they are. As a piece of entertainment, this work is superb and indicative of great craftsmanship on the part of both composer and poet.

The Croydon Advertiser, 28th October 1965


Pastiches, opus 4d (1949/1950, 1988, 1994)

…and very skilful parodies they are. As a piece of entertainment, this work is superb and indicative of great craftsmanship on the part of both composer and poet.

The Croydon Advertiser, 28th October 1965


Patterns, opus 31a (October 1960)

…in which art is successfully concealed under a light and attractive style.

Musical Opinion, September 1961

Carey Blyton is one of the more promising of the saner young composers, and I was attracted to these pieces in which strict forms are cleverly concealed under a light and melodious appearance.

Pianomaker, September 1961

These moderately easy pieces by a young composer of distinction offer an attractive addition to the repertoire of piano music in a contemporary but approachable idiom.

Music Teacher, December 1961

…These three pieces are constructively interesting … yet all falls delightfully upon the ear—art rises triumphantly above artifice.

Music Trades Review, March 1962

…All obviously attractive, musically.

Kentish Times, 16th October 1964


Royal Sequence, opus 77 (June 1977)

…is well written, in an attractive, listenable style … Clarinets choirs, especially in high schools, will enjoy performing this work.

Norman Heim, Woodwind World, Brass & Percussion, Spring 1978


Saxe Blue, opus 65b (Spring 1972)

Carey Blyton’s catchy “Saxe Blue” would prove an excellent addition to the repertoire of any Grade 6 players, and is thoroughly recommended.

Graham Wade, Making Music, Summer 1976


Saxe Blue, opus 65c (April 1978)

Carey Blyton’s catchy “Saxe Blue” would prove an excellent addition to the repertoire of any Grade 6 players, and is thoroughly recommended.

Graham Wade, Making Music, Summer 1976


Scherzo, opus 3 (1949/1950)

…it is the arid harmonies that give this little piece its interest and vitality.

Making Music, Autumn 1965

The short and concise Scherzo for clarinet (B flat) and piano by Carey Blyton has an engaging wistfulness which makes it a joy to listen to, while the little spice in the piano part gives it that extra bit of character (medium).

The Musical Times, November 1966


Seven Polyphonic Amens, opus 43 (1964)

These are imaginative and most effective and by now will have found a respected place in many an English parish church and cathedral.

Max Laidlaw, The Leader Post (Regina, Canada), 23th August 1969


Six Regional Canadian Folk Songs, opus 39 (August 1963)

An Eskimo Lullaby may seem to us more interesting than Camptown Races

Musical Opinion, September 1954

…old, open-air bonhomie of the Canadian songs…

Records and Recording, April 1964

…you should assuredly purchase Onslo’s new LP containing further Canadian folk songs by the Beckenham composer, Carey Blyton. (The first disc … was highly praised by me two years ago.)

The Croydon Advertiser, 31st March 1966

The piano accompaniments are simple and unobtrusive—this, indeed, is their greatest virtue. An excellent collection…

Michael Hurd, Music in Education, May/June, 1967

…the accompaniments are interesting, making them suitable for almost any age range from the junior school upwards.

Making Music, Summer 1967

…an edition that will recommend itself to schools. There is a quiet gem in An Eskimo Lullaby

Elizabeth Poston, The Musical Times, September 1967


Stephen was a Stable-boy, opus 56b (1968)

It is a happy creation and has the added advantage of being quite unsophisticated. Its appeal to children should be irresistible.

William Varcoe, The Lincolnshire Echo, 15th November 1968

(The Danish and Swedish carols) both have a haunting musical arrangement which will make them an unusual acquisition to the Christmas repertoire.

Max Laidlaw, The Leader Post (Regina, Canada), 23th August 1969


[CD] Sweeney Todd & Dracula! (2005)

Carey Blyton belongs to that select band of composers whose music can make you laugh out loud … should be explored by enterprising school music staff.

David Shellan, Kentish Times, 20th August 1984

But for sheer fun, his two Victorian Melodramas for Schools are convulsing, especially when performed with the prescribed ‘Music Hall Orchestra’ … A recording by the Redbridge School on Meridian is well recommended.

Wally Horwood, The British Bandsman, March 1985


Sweeney Todd the Barber, or The Demon Barber of Fleet Street, opus 79 (November 1977)

The music is absolutely splendid, capturing the atmosphere unusually well.

David Llewellyn Green, Music Teacher, September 1981

But for sheer fun, his two Victorian Melodramas for Schools are convulsing, especially when performed with the prescribed ‘Music Hall Orchestra’ … A recording by the Redbridge School on Meridian is well recommended.

Wally Horwood, The British Bandsman, March 1985


The Ash Grove (November 1957)

…effective and imaginative…

Music Teacher

…very attractive arrangement…

Musical Opinion


The Birds of the Air, opus 59 (1971)

…exploited nature sounds imaginatively without for once evoking the name of Messiaen in the listener’s mind.

Stainton Taylor, The Liverpool Echo, 5th July 1971


The Bream, opus 51 (1967)

…is quite fascinating and is constructed on traditional harmonies, but rich in clever and persuasive implications, with a fine use of artificial harmonics.

Angelo Gilardino, Strumenti e Musica, May 1973


The Christ Church Carol (To Bethlehem) (16th August 1978)

…highly recommended

Church Music Quarterly


The Christmas Spirit, opus 55a (1968)

There seems no reason why this work should not enjoy wide popularity.

Norman Harvey, Kentish Times, 27th December 1968

It will probably, in time, become a standard Christmas work.

E.A.K., The Croydon Advertiser, 2nd January 1969


The Christmas Spirit, opus 55b (1969)

There seems no reason why this work should not enjoy wide popularity.

Norman Harvey, Kentish Times, 27th December 1968

It will probably, in time, become a standard Christmas work.

E.A.K., The Croydon Advertiser, 2nd January 1969


The Christmas Spirit, opus 55c (19th June 2011)

There seems no reason why this work should not enjoy wide popularity.

Norman Harvey, Kentish Times, 27th December 1968

It will probably, in time, become a standard Christmas work.

E.A.K., The Croydon Advertiser, 2nd January 1969


The Faber Book of Nursery Songs, opus 53 (1967)

The other outstanding feature is the music itself. So skilfully has Carey Blyton arranged the accompaniments in this book that each song is now a perfect miniature.

Kevin Mayhew, Catholic Herald, 22nd November 1968

Only a deep understanding of the poetic importance of this infants’ heritage could have sustained such meticulous care. This book takes its place as a definitive work…

David Holbrook, The Times, 23th November 1968

Carey Blyton’s settings, often a witty commentary on the more conventional ones, always illuminate the verses by the simplest means.

Mary Chandler, Composer, Autumn 1969

…the nursery rhymes are given a new dimension in the musical scores by Carey Blyton…

Robin King, New Zealand Listener, 23th January 1969

No nursery, private or public, day or night, can possibly afford to be without this enchanting book … The only way to get this book will be to buy it or to steal it. There will be no lending.

The Times Educational Supplement, 31st January 1969

Musicologist Carey Blyton’s easy scores make the book particularly enjoyable.

Patricia Miles Martin, The Fresno Bulletin (USA), 7th June 1969

…will have a universal welcome.

Max Laidlaw, The Leader Post (Regina, Canada), 1st November 1969

Simple and graceful piano accompaniments.

The New York Times, 9th November 1969

…with simple piano arrangements by the well-known musicologist Carey Blyton.

The Sunday Star-Bulletin & Advertiser (Honolulu), 21st December 1969


The Goshawk (January 1969)

…after the first minute of the film I suspected: here again was so much underlined with such telling economy … So it was with a certain sense of self-satisfaction that I saw, at the end of the film, ‘Music by Carey Blyton’.

Hilton Gough, BFFS Film magazine, no 25, April 1975


The Hobbit, opus 52a (1967)

The comparative brevity of this piece is a measure of the excellence of the writing and its success … a good opening to a programme without detracting from works of greater stature which may follow.

Reginald Redman, Bristol Evening Post, 19th December 1968

…it was very well orchestrated … The composer was enthusiastically applauded.

Christian Fackrell, Kentish Times, 7th February 1969

…this agreeable little piece, which catches much of the fantasy of the world of J. R. R. Tolkien…

Robert Harris, Richmond Times, 27th February 1970


Workshop 21: The Indian Coffee House Roof Garden Orchestra Tango, opus 92b (1987)

This wind quartet arrangement is sly, seductive and touched with elegant wit.

Rob Barnett, MusicWeb International, December 2016


The Poetry of Dress, opus 25 (Summer/Winter 1956)

…a clean, easy style that shows decided promise, and a refreshing scorn for ‘mere vocal effect’.

Musical Opinion, April 1960

…are grateful to sing and easy to play.

Music and Letters, October 1960


The Silly Flea, opus 33a (August 1962)

We particularly like a short modern madrigal for unaccompanied SATB, The Silly Flea, an amusing and not too difficult song of great delight by Carey Blyton.

Making Music, Spring 1965

Of considerable interest were three works by Carey Blyton: Love is a sickness, Stay, O sweet and The Silly Flea. Here we had mature, sonorous music well laid out for the voices and interesting to both singers and listeners … these delightful works, of which The Silly Flea received a first performance.

Kentish Times, 8th April 1966


The Silly Flea, opus 33b (September 1962)

We are pleased to note that The Silly Flea is now available for male voices. It would well repay study.

Making Music, Summer 1965


Three a.m., opus 9 (June/July 1951)

They were all written when he was only nineteen, and are remarkable productions for such early work.

Michael Pilkington, Singing

His settings showed exceptional sensitivity to words and music…

Beckenham Journal, 11th April 1952


Songs for Juniors 3: Three Bird Songs, opus 38a (July/December 1963)

The music had its own poetry, matching the fantasy of the words, and Blyton’s strong melodic sense stood him in good stead. One of the Three Insect Songs, Poor Fly, was a miniature gem.

Kentish Times, 16th October 1964

…Stainer & Bell Ltd have, I am sure, winners in their Songs for Juniors, in which Carey Blyton has done the hat trick with three irresistible small books … Impossible to say who will get most kick out of these, juniors or seniors. The choice of words is inspired, whether from Harry Graham, A. P. Herbert, Don Marquis or the composer. The Sink Song is guaranteed to cheer the daily slubbery gloopery as a kitchen classic of inspired Jabberwocky. Try these. Buy them.

The Musical Times, December 1965

The expressions on the faces of the children as they launched into Mr Blyton’s work showed clearly why he is gaining such popularity as a composer for young people. [Review of Schools Music Festival in Swanley, Kent, which included performances of Bananas in Pyjamas, Three Food Songs, Three Insect Songs and Three Bird Songs]

T.G.G., Kentish Times, 23th March 1975


Songs for Juniors 3: Three Bird Songs, opus 38b (Summer 1988)

The music had its own poetry, matching the fantasy of the words, and Blyton’s strong melodic sense stood him in good stead. One of the Three Insect Songs, Poor Fly, was a miniature gem.

Kentish Times, 16th October 1964

…Stainer & Bell Ltd have, I am sure, winners in their Songs for Juniors, in which Carey Blyton has done the hat trick with three irresistible small books … Impossible to say who will get most kick out of these, juniors or seniors. The choice of words is inspired, whether from Harry Graham, A. P. Herbert, Don Marquis or the composer. The Sink Song is guaranteed to cheer the daily slubbery gloopery as a kitchen classic of inspired Jabberwocky. Try these. Buy them.

The Musical Times, December 1965


Three Canadian Carols, opus 44 (1964)

…of the three carols I think that The Huron Carol is outstanding, but all three are notable for the effective economy of the accompaniments.

The Gramophone, September 1965

…I hope we shall hear much more of his compositions in “The Gramophone World”.

The Croydon Advertiser, 10th June 1966


Songs for Juniors 1: Three Food Songs, opus 35a (March/April 1963)

The music had its own poetry, matching the fantasy of the words, and Blyton’s strong melodic sense stood him in good stead. One of the Three Insect Songs, Poor Fly, was a miniature gem.

Kentish Times, 16th October 1964

…Stainer & Bell Ltd have, I am sure, winners in their Songs for Juniors, in which Carey Blyton has done the hat trick with three irresistible small books … Impossible to say who will get most kick out of these, juniors or seniors. The choice of words is inspired, whether from Harry Graham, A. P. Herbert, Don Marquis or the composer. The Sink Song is guaranteed to cheer the daily slubbery gloopery as a kitchen classic of inspired Jabberwocky. Try these. Buy them.

The Musical Times, December 1965

The expressions on the faces of the children as they launched into Mr Blyton’s work showed clearly why he is gaining such popularity as a composer for young people. [Review of Schools Music Festival in Swanley, Kent, which included performances of Bananas in Pyjamas, Three Food Songs, Three Insect Songs and Three Bird Songs]

T.G.G., Kentish Times, 23th March 1975


Songs for Juniors 1: Three Food Songs, opus 35b (Summer 1988)

The music had its own poetry, matching the fantasy of the words, and Blyton’s strong melodic sense stood him in good stead. One of the Three Insect Songs, Poor Fly, was a miniature gem.

Kentish Times, 16th October 1964

…Stainer & Bell Ltd have, I am sure, winners in their Songs for Juniors, in which Carey Blyton has done the hat trick with three irresistible small books … Impossible to say who will get most kick out of these, juniors or seniors. The choice of words is inspired, whether from Harry Graham, A. P. Herbert, Don Marquis or the composer. The Sink Song is guaranteed to cheer the daily slubbery gloopery as a kitchen classic of inspired Jabberwocky. Try these. Buy them.

The Musical Times, December 1965


Songs for Juniors 2: Three Insect Songs, opus 40a (August/September 1963)

The music had its own poetry, matching the fantasy of the words, and Blyton’s strong melodic sense stood him in good stead. One of the Three Insect Songs, Poor Fly, was a miniature gem.

Kentish Times, 16th October 1964

…Stainer & Bell Ltd have, I am sure, winners in their Songs for Juniors, in which Carey Blyton has done the hat trick with three irresistible small books … Impossible to say who will get most kick out of these, juniors or seniors. The choice of words is inspired, whether from Harry Graham, A. P. Herbert, Don Marquis or the composer. The Sink Song is guaranteed to cheer the daily slubbery gloopery as a kitchen classic of inspired Jabberwocky. Try these. Buy them.

The Musical Times, December 1965

The expressions on the faces of the children as they launched into Mr Blyton’s work showed clearly why he is gaining such popularity as a composer for young people. [Review of Schools Music Festival in Swanley, Kent, which included performances of Bananas in Pyjamas, Three Food Songs, Three Insect Songs and Three Bird Songs]

T.G.G., Kentish Times, 23th March 1975


Songs for Juniors 2: Three Insect Songs, opus 40b (Summer 1988)

The music had its own poetry, matching the fantasy of the words, and Blyton’s strong melodic sense stood him in good stead. One of the Three Insect Songs, Poor Fly, was a miniature gem.

Kentish Times, 16th October 1964

…Stainer & Bell Ltd have, I am sure, winners in their Songs for Juniors, in which Carey Blyton has done the hat trick with three irresistible small books … Impossible to say who will get most kick out of these, juniors or seniors. The choice of words is inspired, whether from Harry Graham, A. P. Herbert, Don Marquis or the composer. The Sink Song is guaranteed to cheer the daily slubbery gloopery as a kitchen classic of inspired Jabberwocky. Try these. Buy them.

The Musical Times, December 1965


Three Moods, opus 13 (May 1952, revised Winter 1961–2)

…many members of the audience considered these to contain his best work. Certainly these ‘moods’ proved Blyton has a recognisable style.

Beckenham Journal, 4th July 1952


Three Welsh Folk Songs, opus 36 (May/July 1963)

The winners on the disc, I think, are Suo-gân, a splendid Welsh melody … Tryphena Partridge plays the harp accompaniments for the Welsh songs most acceptably…

Records and Recording, April 1964

Of the Welsh songs, I am particularly glad to have the lovely lullaby, Suo-gân … very well accompanied on the harp in the Welsh songs.

The Gramophone, May 1964


Toi et Moi, opus 11 (October/November 1951)

They were all written when he was only nineteen, and are remarkable productions for such early work.

Michael Pilkington, Singing

…the setting of Paul Géraldy’s poem Doute can be recommended in advance as the work of a serious and sensitive composer.

Beckenham Journal, 12th October 1951

The relatively simple accompaniments enhanced Blyton’s keen sense of melodic line; these songs seemed well-written for the voice and gave an effect of their composer’s having achieved his intention.

Beckenham Journal, 11th April 1952

…is, from any standpoint, a superb miniature…

Richard Terry, The Croydon Advertiser, 27th June 1968

It is sad to recall that this work, written as long ago as 1951, had to wait until 1968 for its second performance. Such delightful music … should have been more welcome than it seems to have been…

Norman Harvey, Kentish Times, 28th June 1968


Trio, opus 18a (April/July 1954)

…was an adventurous work, and revealed how rapidly this talented young composer is progressing.

Beckenham and Penge Advertiser, 13th October 1954


Two Pensive Songs, opus 10a (June/August 1951)

They were all written when he was only nineteen, and are remarkable productions for such early work.

Michael Pilkington, Singing

…had unity in inspiration, sensitivity to the poems set, and certainty of execution.

Beckenham Journal, 4th July 1952


Two Sacred Songs, opus 24a (Summer 1956)

…a comparatively simple but very effective song by Carey Blyton called A Litany

Making Music, Spring 1962

Easier, and therefore suitable for less experienced choirs, is Carey Blyton’s charming A Lullaby, which is a setting of the lovely words “O my deir hert.”

Making Music, Autumn 1962

…an economical setting of “Drop, drop, slow tears” (A Litany)…

The Musical Times, April 1962

To choirs on the look-out for new songs and cantatas for the Christmas season, I recommend the following … Carey Blyton’s A Lullaby

Musical Opinion, September 1962

Some outstanding works for the Christmas season include A Lullaby by Carey Blyton…

Pianomaker, September 1962

Like much of Mr Blyton’s work, particularly his songs, A Lullaby has much charm, a pleasant melodic line and great expressive qualities … Mr Blyton is fast achieving a reputation as a composer of talent.

The Croydon Advertiser, 10th January 1963

…and among other carols, A Lullaby by Carey Blyton, which proved effective music.

Kentish Times, 17th January 1964


Two Sacred Songs, opus 24b (Winter 1957/Spring 1958)

…a comparatively simple but very effective song by Carey Blyton called A Litany

Making Music, Spring 1962

Easier, and therefore suitable for less experienced choirs, is Carey Blyton’s charming A Lullaby, which is a setting of the lovely words “O my deir hert.”

Making Music, Autumn 1962

…an economical setting of “Drop, drop, slow tears” (A Litany)…

The Musical Times, April 1962

To choirs on the look-out for new songs and cantatas for the Christmas season, I recommend the following … Carey Blyton’s A Lullaby

Musical Opinion, September 1962

Some outstanding works for the Christmas season include A Lullaby by Carey Blyton…

Pianomaker, September 1962

Like much of Mr Blyton’s work, particularly his songs, A Lullaby has much charm, a pleasant melodic line and great expressive qualities … Mr Blyton is fast achieving a reputation as a composer of talent.

The Croydon Advertiser, 10th January 1963

…and among other carols, A Lullaby by Carey Blyton, which proved effective music.

Kentish Times, 17th January 1964


What then is Love?, opus 26a (Summer 1956)

…once the modern idiom has been assimilated, the cycle is most rewarding.

Making Music, Autumn 1960

Groups looking for something more adventurous, yet in an acceptable idiom, will find Carey Blyton’s cycle very effective.

The Times Educational Supplement, 10th February 1961

Though technically not easy to perform, they are well worth the effort to prepare for public performance, for they will not only prove enjoyable to learn, but will give pleasure to an audience.

Teachers’ World, 24th March 1961

…the third, Stay, O sweet, and do not rise!, has a certain sombre, esoteric appeal, and the last, Love is a sickness full of woes, exhibits some lively part-writing and some telling harmonic effects…

The Croydon Advertiser, 16th May 1963

Of considerable interest were three works by Carey Blyton: Love is a sickness, Stay, O sweet and The Silly Flea. Here we had mature, sonorous music well laid out for the voices and interesting to both singers and listeners … these delightful works, of which The Silly Flea received a first performance.

Kentish Times, 8th April 1966


What then is Love?, opus 26b (Autumn 1956)

…once the modern idiom has been assimilated, the cycle is most rewarding.

Making Music, Autumn 1960

Groups looking for something more adventurous, yet in an acceptable idiom, will find Carey Blyton’s cycle very effective.

The Times Educational Supplement, 10th February 1961

Though technically not easy to perform, they are well worth the effort to prepare for public performance, for they will not only prove enjoyable to learn, but will give pleasure to an audience.

Teachers’ World, 24th March 1961

…the third, Stay, O sweet, and do not rise!, has a certain sombre, esoteric appeal, and the last, Love is a sickness full of woes, exhibits some lively part-writing and some telling harmonic effects…

The Croydon Advertiser, 16th May 1963

Of considerable interest were three works by Carey Blyton: Love is a sickness, Stay, O sweet and The Silly Flea. Here we had mature, sonorous music well laid out for the voices and interesting to both singers and listeners … these delightful works, of which The Silly Flea received a first performance.

Kentish Times, 8th April 1966


What then is Love?, opus 26c (Spring 1956/Winter 1957)

…once the modern idiom has been assimilated, the cycle is most rewarding.

Making Music, Autumn 1960

Though technically not easy to perform, they are well worth the effort to prepare for public performance, for they will not only prove enjoyable to learn, but will give pleasure to an audience.

Teachers’ World, 24th March 1961

…the third, Stay, O sweet, and do not rise!, has a certain sombre, esoteric appeal, and the last, Love is a sickness full of woes, exhibits some lively part-writing and some telling harmonic effects…

The Croydon Advertiser, 16th May 1963

Of considerable interest were three works by Carey Blyton: Love is a sickness, Stay, O sweet and The Silly Flea. Here we had mature, sonorous music well laid out for the voices and interesting to both singers and listeners … these delightful works, of which The Silly Flea received a first performance.

Kentish Times, 8th April 1966


What then is Love?, opus 26d (November 1957)

…once the modern idiom has been assimilated, the cycle is most rewarding.

Making Music, Autumn 1960

Groups looking for something more adventurous, yet in an acceptable idiom, will find Carey Blyton’s cycle very effective.

The Times Educational Supplement, 10th February 1961

Though technically not easy to perform, they are well worth the effort to prepare for public performance, for they will not only prove enjoyable to learn, but will give pleasure to an audience.

Teachers’ World, 24th March 1961

…the third, Stay, O sweet, and do not rise!, has a certain sombre, esoteric appeal, and the last, Love is a sickness full of woes, exhibits some lively part-writing and some telling harmonic effects…

The Croydon Advertiser, 16th May 1963

Of considerable interest were three works by Carey Blyton: Love is a sickness, Stay, O sweet and The Silly Flea. Here we had mature, sonorous music well laid out for the voices and interesting to both singers and listeners … these delightful works, of which The Silly Flea received a first performance.

Kentish Times, 8th April 1966


What then is Love?, opus 26e (July 1972)

…once the modern idiom has been assimilated, the cycle is most rewarding.

Making Music, Autumn 1960

Groups looking for something more adventurous, yet in an acceptable idiom, will find Carey Blyton’s cycle very effective.

The Times Educational Supplement, 10th February 1961

Though technically not easy to perform, they are well worth the effort to prepare for public performance, for they will not only prove enjoyable to learn, but will give pleasure to an audience.

Teachers’ World, 24th March 1961

…the third, Stay, O sweet, and do not rise!, has a certain sombre, esoteric appeal, and the last, Love is a sickness full of woes, exhibits some lively part-writing and some telling harmonic effects…

The Croydon Advertiser, 16th May 1963


Comments about Carey Blyton and his music in general

…beautifully crafted works of art, complete in themselves despite their brevity…

A fellow composer, speaking of his pieces written for recorded music libraries

…fondly remembered as an exceptional teacher … took an interest in my work beyond my other tutors … can clearly remember [his] gentle demeanor and sincerity as well as his encouragement … Carey was unforgettable…

James Shuster, one-time student of Carey’s at The Guildhall

I find Carey Blyton’s music irresistible.

Brian Hick, Musical Opinion

MUSIC FOR CHILDREN
General Review of Concert

…Such forbidding words as ‘passacaglia’ and ‘ostinato’ came into the commentary, but nothing could have been less forbidding than the music itself, which always sounded fresh and spontaneous and easy (with much of the art which conceals art) and fell gratefully on the ear. Clearly, Mr Blyton has a melodic gift. Also a sense of humour.

The Croydon Advertiser, 15th October 1964

…cries out for revaluation as a genuine 20th Century musical maverick…

EPTA Journal, 1996

Carey Blyton was highly regarded and popular with generations of Open University students attending the Arts Foundation summer schools held at Westfield College, Hampstead, in the 1980s […] His company was always delightful, amusing and infectious, and sometimes naughty. He created happy occasions for everyone.

Frank Hakney, The Times, 24th July 2002

The music speaks of a salubrious and dignified creative imagination. Carey Blyton knew music’s art and craftsman’s measure and wrote nothing ugly or dull or at odds with art or craft.

Rob Barnett, MusicWeb International, December 2016